In-Group Favoritism Is Difficult to Change

440 Views | 2 Replies | Last: 4 mo ago by AD22
DuckPlanner
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Pretty good article in Scientific American about some studies about in-group identification and bias.
"Taken together, all of this research shows just how little it takes to elicit strong group attachments-- even in randomly assigned social identities-- and just how much it takes to change people's in-group favoritism. As Yang and Dunham note, their findings have relevance to the broader project of understanding the early emergence of prejudice and discrimination. It really does seem as though mere membership in a group is enough to bring out robust in-group favoritism-- competition and scarce resources are not necessary conditions."



ScoopDuck Utopia
onaduck
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Cool article. I try to read and learn about social dynamics as much as I can. I'm especially interested in how this stuff works in the social media age. A lot of the research I've read trace this kind of associations all the way back to our earliest human selves--our lizard brained selves--where survival meant quickly aligning to stay alive. Makes a lot of sense when you think about realities of our earliest ancestors. But what does it mean now that we are so far removed from our earliest selves and the relationships of technology are completely meaningless and trivial. Yet the filter removed by the anonymity and distance of technology allows people to align instantaneously and without the constraints of normal social interactions. But this article has me thinking about how instinctive and instant it really is every aspect.
AD22
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onaduck said:

Cool article. I try to read and learn about social dynamics as much as I can. I'm especially interested in how this stuff works in the social media age. A lot of the research I've read trace this kind of associations all the way back to our earliest human selves--our lizard brained selves--where survival meant quickly aligning to stay alive. Makes a lot of sense when you think about realities of our earliest ancestors. But what does it mean now that we are so far removed from our earliest selves and the relationships of technology are completely meaningless and trivial. Yet the filter removed by the anonymity and distance of technology allows people to align instantaneously and without the constraints of normal social interactions. But this article has me thinking about how instinctive and instant it really is every aspect.
A younger me would say it is easy because it was. But if you are true to yourself you will thrive.

My younger self was right just not in every stop in life, there will be failures. Can you pick yourself up when you fail? Belief in yourself and strength of will matters most.

Be strong, be yourself.
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